Snacks expended

Extruded direct expanded snacks are typically puffy, crispy or crunchy cereal or starch “finger foods” that come in a variety of shapes and sizes and which are textured and often coated to make them convenient, tasty and fun. They are eaten at all times of the day and can be sweet or savory. Snacks are eaten for pleasure, but increasingly, they need to be healthier as well. Clextral’s twin-screw processing systems enable snack makers to meet all these criteria and meet ever-changing consumer demand, enabling them to enhance their brands locally and internationally.

Snacks come in all shapes and sizes

Clextral twin-screw extrusion systems can process a vast choice of raw materials to make expanded snacks. These can be shaped and textured with a wide variety of sweet or savory coatings. Inclusions of all sorts can be added to enhance taste and nutritional characteristics, including whole cereals, oats, puffed rice and even dried or moist vegetables, such as carrots, tomatoes, peas, lentils and even algae or other exotic products.

Advances in extruder die and cutter designs also give processors an entirely new set of templates to create innovative shapes. Filled snacks can be made on the same production equipment as directly expanded snacks using the co-extrusion add-on kit.

Clextral’s creative expertise

Extruded directly expanded snacks

  • Ingredient flexibility
    • Processing of a wide range of raw materials – corn, wheat, rice, rye, potato and many other products
    • Variable granularity, from fine flour to semolina
  • Production of various shapes and sizes – balls, sticks, pillows, animals, stars, rings, curls, chips, etc.
  • Sweet and savory coatings, including 1+1 oil slurry and powders (cheese, paprika, salt, tomatoes, spices, etc.)
  • Multiple colors

Click here for more details about Clextral snack lines

Download our snacks brochure

Did you know?

The global ready-to-eat snack market generates $500 to $600 billion of sales annually and will continue to grow strongly in the years to come.

News